Tag Archives: PhotoGiraff

Diverse Dancers – Exhibition Soiree

25 Feb

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Diverse Dancers is the title given to a large and still progressing compilation of photographs, primarily concerned with the multiplicity of varying dance traditions; a small and miscellaneous selection of which, is currently in exhibition at the ORT Cafe in Birmingham, UK (from 19th Feb – 5th Mar’14).

Housed in The Old Print Works, a grade II listed building; Ort is much more than just a cafe.  More importantly, it has become the community hub for creative art within just 2 years of being established, having gained the worthy reputation of supporting emerging artists, in the community of England’s second largest city!   With its friendly and approachable directors, Josephine Reichert and Ridhi Kalaria, who both actively assist the artists they support, Ort is the ideal place for an emerging artist, to host a first time solo exhibition.  And on Friday 21st Feb’14, that is exactly what Najma Hush did, having curated a night of art, poetry and music by hosting talented poets and musicians to share their work, which coincided with the dance theme of her exhibition.  She called this event, ‘An Exhibition for Exhibitionists’ and boy did it attract a handsome group.

Upon the night as the crowd gathered and mingled they were greeted by live music from the Jazz Pianist, Andrew Clayton, who played all original material from his Album, Bunch of Keys.  Quick to jump at an opportunity to jam, poetry performer, Carys Matic Jones joined in with her Cajón Drum, adding a beat to Clayton’s melody and giving all the guests, opportune moments to collectively convene a vibrant atmosphere.  

The show then commenced with the local poet, Adele – aka- Ddotti Bluebird, who also organises Birmingham’s much loved Word- Up.  She grabbed the crowd’s attention with her passionate urban style poetry.  However, rather surprisingly for the host, none of this Ddotti Bluebird’s songs conformed to the theme of dance.

Following on swiftly, was Adam Laws, a complete virgin to performance poetry, who nevertheless, won the crowd over with two poems that he had written especially for the theme of this event.

But the real crowd pleaser was a musical performance by Walsall’s poet, Al Barz who had composed his own music to choreograph a special dance for a totally interactive, audience precipitation and the best thing was, everyone could do his dance sitting down, except for Barz of course (who also organises his own monthly poetry events called Purple Penumbra at the Barlowe Theatre in Oldbury).

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Next up was what appeared to be Cinderella herself, sporting a broom and sweeping the stage, but it was in fact, Andrea Shorrick, with her own unique interpretation of dance, a delightful poem titled Prince Charming.

Also come to take part and show her support was Jude Ashworth, a long and withstanding member of Writer Without Borders as well as being the organiser of Erdington Writers held twice a month at Erdington Library, she swayed and swooned the audience with her dance poetry.

After that, the crowd was gregariously greeted by the enormous personality of  Ian Henery, the Mayor of Walsall’s Poet Laureate for three consecutive years and author of Batman (Thynk Publications).  Amongst a few other dance poems, Henery, performed his poem written especially for Diverse Dancers called….Diverse Dancers and also read Rudyard Kipling’s,  The Plea of the Simla Dancers. Not before however, he likened the talent of the first halves performers, to our Nation’s favourite poet, Kipling and was ignominiously heckled for it by an otherwise anonymous heckler, who rowdily disagreed.

Another member of Birmingham’s highly esteemed group, Writers Without Borders and author of Blonde Grass (Thynk Publications), Olufemi Abidogun also graced the stage with his own magical poetry on the subject of dance.

Just before the interval, the closing act for the first half was the third and final member of Writers Without Borders.    It was none other than, Tessa Lowe herself, who also hosts her own poetry events at Ort called Poets with Passion.  Lowe charmed the crowd with her charismatic, Maybe Baby dance poem, as well as sharing an enchanting poem, celebrating the ‘beauty’ of Birmingham’s, not-so-prevaliged, Balsall Heath (the location of Ort Cafe and hence the exhibition).

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To kick start the second half, Carys Matic Jones opened the proceedings with her musical act.  Normally performing with her band, Jones was joined with improvisations from Andrew Clayton on Keyboard, as she multi-tasked her rhythmic recitations to the beat of her new Cajón Drum, which proved to be a very delightful and an engaging experience indeed.

A hard act to follow, which certainly she did do and without any exceptions, it was Nina Lewis.  An ex-dancer herself, Lewis claimed that she had been directly inspired by the Photographs exhibited.  Her poems not only dealt with the beauty of the art form, but also explored the darker more painful side of dance, that we as voyeurs often forget when watching this graceful art form.  Needless to say, all three of her poems were very strong.

It was also a great pleasure to see, popular storyteller, Kate Walton – Aka – Story Tramp (nominated for outstanding newcomer at the BASE Awards, ((British Award for Storytelling Excellence)) 2013.  She captivated and simply mesmerised the audience, with her rhythmic tale of a Sufi whirling dervish’s.

Birmingham Poet Laureate 1999/2000, Simon Pitt also made a special guest appearance with his slightly eccentric performance. One act of which, he threw things at the audience in a fit of rage.  It was a rather convincing temper tantrum and nothing like I’ve ever seen in my life, so I’m glad to have finally had such a frightful experience, whilst in such a friendly environment. It wasn’t all gloom and doom of course as Pitt soon lightened the tone offering the crowd a brighter side to his sense of humor.

It was a pleasure to become acquainted with Lorna Meehan s work, especially as she had just come off her first poetry tour with England and Scotland’s leading poetry organisation, Apples and Snakes .  Her act was a real delight.  Rumour also has it, that Meehan is presently preparing to be the world’s first hula hooping performance poet…

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A local poet, Max Jalil who rarely ever shares his work, shyly decided to pluck up his courage and read his witty poems on the subject of his horrendous dance antics, which is something that he is rather notorious for on the clubbers scene.  After having seen both of his talents, one would probably suggest that Jalil gives up dance and takes up poetry instead – as his poem really was rather good.

Najma Hush also shared two short and sweet poems before passing on the mic to none other than yet another poet laureate.  It was Roy Mcfarlen (Birmingham, 2010/2011), who had come to show his support for Hush’s events once again.  The enigmatic Mcfarlen who never fails to delight a crowd of poetry lovers drew the perfect close to an almost perfect night, as the host called the show a rap and let the crowd loose to get closer to view her work and stay around to chat and indulge in a few more drinks.     

Here are some more photographs to get you better acquainted with all the performers who came along… and look out for the uploads from Pat the Bull Films who kindly filmed that night’s events to broadcast to the world … after all…these open exhibition soiree’s aren’t titled, ‘Exhibitions for Exhibitionists’ for nothing, you know.

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Alien’s Have Feelings Too! (Part Three)

16 Apr

A Photography project aimed to develop the Emotional Literacy of vulnerable school children.

Week 2: Aliens and Frames

Week 2: Aliens and Frames

 Working with:

Group A – Year 2 (6-7 year olds)

Morning session 2.5 hrs

                              Group B – Year 3 (7-8 year olds)

                                    Afternoon session 2.5 hrs

Objectives:

1. Story Telling with Persona Dolls:  Using dolls as realia to create a fictional character the children can relate to, thereby allowing them the freedom to express and share a problem openly and furthermore search for possible resolutions.

2. Framing and Composition:  Introduction to using camera’s, implementing framing techniques to capture  the ‘Persona Doll’ under varying light, at different angles, whilst using various props from the environment familiar to the children.

  

 Week Two:

Introducing the ‘Alien’ Doll Family

No - Not frogs - Aliens!

Alien Doll Family

When researching methods to utilise to developing the Emotional Literacy of students at Priory Lower School (Bedford), I was not aware of exactly what was currently hindering each child’s ability to succeed in class and possibly even in their future life.  Although it was quite clear that the children selected did not know how to identify, label and talk about their feelings; which is why it was my job to help them to be able to express this.  However, how could I do that without getting them to expose themselves openly; which could quite possibly be threatening for anyone at any age? And then – to do this, precisely using photography?  Within four, 2.5 hour sessions?

Here, might I add, that by no means have I come to invent any of the ideas presented herewith on my own, but rather, I have discovered and manipulated carefully researched theories and practices,  to create one thematic unified, cohesive scheme of work that can be delivered logically, over four different periods.

The idea of creating the ‘Alien’ theme was initiated by the theories and practices, discovered regarding the use of ‘Persona Dolls’ in the classroom to help children develop their Emotional Literacy.  These theories suggest, that Dolls, in ‘telling their own stories‘ to the children, encourage children to tell their own.   I had anticipated that this would help the children, who were perceived to be different, to develop stories that would support and validate them.  When selecting the dolls I felt it was important that the dolls themselves were not representative of any gender, race or age, but rather they would (on a subconscious level) be symbolic, as a ‘universal’ icon for being different.  Based upon these notions, it was integral that the chosen ‘Persona Dolls’ were ones that the children had never seen or played with before.

As in the previous article Aliens have feelings too! – (Part 2), I will maintain the details to the session in brief, providing only the lesson plan material, including some pictures from the session and ending the article will be a short conclusion, detailing problems I had not foreseen   All references to works sited will appear at the end of the article as ‘Other Useful Links’.

Classroom Warm-up

  1. Review:  Vocabulary of Emotion, using the smiley face pictures from week one to elicit what the learners can remember.
  2. Class Warm-Up:  A practice run through of the Drama activity from last week.
  3. Analysing Photography:  Students view photographs from my portfolio consisting of Landscapes, Abstracts and Stills  to discuss what kind of emotions they feel when they look at these photographs.  We discussed  several emotions, they felt were conveyed by these photographs.  This demonstrated to them how photographs can tell stories about feelings and it was a nice way to illustrate, introduce and explain to them what they would be doing in the following sessions with me.

 1. Story Telling with Persona Dolls

Activating Schemata:

a.  Lay out all the dolls at the front of the classroom where the children can see them.  They must not – at this stage  – touch the dolls (this can be quite challenging as the children will very much want to touch and feel them immediately).

b.  Introduce the Dolls as ‘Our Alien Doll Family’.  Tell the children that these are an Alien family that they will be working with to take photographs.

c. Tell the children that each doll has a name, a problem and a story, but we don’t know what these names, problems and stories are yet,  because each of them will have to create this themselves.

d. Take one doll and place it in your lap.  Tell the children that this is your Doll. Your dolls name is (e.g.) Coo-coo.  Coo-Coo has a problem. (e.g.) He is really friendly and wants to make friends with some children, but the children are all afraid of him because, he is so different and so they always run away from him and hide.  They never play with him.

e. Ask the children ‘how do you think Coo-Coo feels?’

f.  Draw an empty circle on the board and ask which child can draw Coo-coo’s face which will show us all how he feels.

g.  Draw a thought bubble and ask which child can tell you what they think Coo-Coo is thinking.

h.  Draw a speech bubble and ask which child can tell you what they think Coo-Coo is thinking.  (*Depending on how much time you can assign to this task, it may be best to write on the board yourself, as some children might have problems with spelling).

exercise 5 - PDF worksheet

click here for the PDF worksheet – exercise 5

exercise 5.

  1. Give your Alien a name:
  2. Give your Alien a face to show how s/he is feeling.

  3.  In the speech bubble write down what the alien wants to say.

  4. In the thought bubble, write down what your alien is thinking.

 

Child doing Exersice 5

Creating a Persona for the Doll

i. Separate the children to sit further apart from one another (so they do not copy each other as the work must come from themselves).

j.  Before you handout  the worksheet for exercise 5., make it clear that they must not write anything down on the sheets until you tell them to (or else some will write all sorts of things before they understand what they need to do).

k. When they have the sheets, give them step by step instructions on how to complete each section. Explain to them that when they are asked to write something down they must not shout out or else someone else in the room might copy their idea and we wouldn’t want that.

l.  Make sure to go around and help each child individually and to also check that they are doing the exercise correctly.

m. Once finished the children share their ideas from their worksheet with the rest of the group.

2. Framing and Composition

Here is an exercise to teach children something about how we take photographs that are aesthetically pleasing so that they too can think about the artistic arrangement of different parts of a photograph. When teaching them about composition, it’s important for the children to learn about angles (i.e when they turn their camera or move their body, they can capture different types of photographs).

The primary prop used for this activity is a set of rectangular frames (8” x 10”), which I cut out of an abundance of cardboard boxes with a craft knife.    I did this about 16 times so that I could have one frame for each child, plus one for myself and some spares if the children tore or lost their frames.  The reason for the frame being rectangular is because that is the shape of most camera viewfinders, as well as most photographic prints and it can allow you to teach the children how to compose both landscape and portrait photographs.  Had I had more times with the children, I would have got them to decorate their individual frames, so that it would then possess more value to them.  However, since my time was limited it was not really an option, though I would highly recommend doing so.  Together, you could have all sorts of fun using colour pens, glitter, paper shapes, glue etc. to make the frames look really gorgeous.

Frame it

Framing it

a) Framing It

I. Before giving the children the frames, ask them to join together the thumbs and index fingers from both hands to make a rectangular shape and look through it.  Tell them to imagine that this is their camera and this is what they will use to practice taking photographs until they get really good and then we can all move onto using the real cameras.

II.  Show children the 2 different angles they can hold the camera to create a portrait (vertical) and landscape (horizontal) composition.  Test them by playing, “Simon Says, (e.g.take a picture in the room of something beginning with …X… in…), portrait” –  or – “landscape” to see if they have got it.

III.  Line up the children in single file in front of an empty chair.  Now with yourself sitting on the chair,  the first child in-line takes a picture of you posing as the model and then goes to the back of the queue.  In this way, get them to take pictures on their wee-little-thumb-and- index- finger-cameras, instructing them to take pictures of different parts of your face and body (e.g. “take a landscape picture of the side of my face – or my face with my eyes cut out of the frame – take a portrait picture of just my foot without my leg – take a landscape picture of my hand on my knee”).

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IV.  Take the children around the school with the cardboard frame and ask them to take photographs with the frame of things they like (e.g.  I took them outside in the nursery garden and nursery play-area and instructed them which objects to take pictures of).

V.  Take out the Dolls and place them in view of the children.  Handout the cameras and when they have them all switched on give them the cardboard frame.  Ask them the name of their doll and then select a doll to give to them.  Now they take photographs of their Aliens in awkward positions all around the garden and nursery play area.  Children are reminded to think about their Aliens name and how the Alien is feeling at all times.

VI.  Return back to the class room.  Sit in a circle or in way where everyone can see the photographs.  Go through each students photographs editing them by keeping the best ones and deleting the not so good ones.  In total each child should have  5 of their best photographs from the session.  Whilst doing this, talk about each photograph.  What makes it so good? How does it make us feel? How does the Alien feel in each picture?  Point out things about angles and composition to encourage them to note this.

VII.  Homework is set for the children to take the frames and cameras home to take pictures of objects that they think their Alien would like to see, using the the pieces of equipment as we had practiced in this session.

Conclusion:

2.  Framing and Composition:

The reason I am beginning the conclusion with Activity 2 from the session is because with hindsight,  I realise now that I should have done it in this order in the first instance –  leaving out steps V & VI (i.e taking photographs around the school) – to move on to exercise 5. (i.e. creating ‘Persona Dolls’)  – and then returning to steps V & VI thereafter.   This would have given the activity more momentum, as I found that the children could not connect the writing they had done in Activity 1, to taking photographs in Activity 2.  Had I conducted the session this way round, they might have been able to make a better connection. Though it must be said that the photographs they have taken are magnificent.  They paid attention to the framing and angling in their compositions and with the use of other props achieved some very creative results.

On the flip-side,  I was very disappointed that the school had forgotten to charge the batteries for the camera’s, the day before my session.  So instead of using the digital camera’s, we had to use Macbooks instead.  This was a bit tricky and annoying, as I could not teach the children how to use the frames with the small digital-cameras as I had planned, which would have assisted them with their assigned homework.  I suppose the Macbook with it’s own frame did function as a built on rectangular frame, but the cases they were in, kept flapping over the view finder, which hindered their abilities slightly and gave them a great cause for complaint.  Also, the Macbooks are quite heavy when you are just 6 years old and the younger children struggled with this as well as having to move around with the doll, putting it in different places around the garden and nursery.  What also ended up happening with the year 2’s, is that unknowingly they made a lot more videos than having taken photographs because of the way the MacBooks operate, it was hard for them to tell when they were taking pictures and when they were making video.  As ancient as I may sound, I have never used a Macbook before so I did not predict this issue.

With all that said and done, we got through it in the end.  The children enjoyed themselves and we all loved the photographs taken from the sessions, which will be revealed here, on PhotoGiraffe Live Art after the end of week four when the project ends.

1. Story Telling with Persona Dolls: 

Going through this exercise with the children was quite challenging for both of us.  Putting the theories into practice was not as easy as I had anticipated.   I expected  the children to reveal something about themselves to me through this set of activities, but most of them told me that their Alien was quite happy.  This came as a bit of a surprise to me as I had thought they had been selected for this project because they had some problems that they felt they could not talk about.  However, one girl did tell me that her Alien was lonely.  This should not have thrilled me as much as it did, as I felt I had made some sort of break through.  All in all, I learnt that most of the children I was working with were very happy, bubbly children with no real personal issues that I could help them resolve.  This is of course exactly how a child should be, but for the purpose of story building and problem solving, well I felt I had kind of missed the point somewhere.  By the end of the session I had a great many happy Aliens, with no problems to solve…where had I gone wrong?  I suppose the activity for most had succeeded at expressing their internal joy but they had forgotten their Alien had a character and how each picture they were taking related to the Aliens story.    Maybe they never really had  had an opportunity to ever access their feelings enough to be able to express them?   Maybe they are just very normal happy children, the way they should be? Or perhaps they were just too young for the exercises I had devised?

One thing I learnt first hand, (as I had been warned by the senior teacher at the start) was that these children although quite pleasant and happy, really did lack a great deal of imagination.  What I hadn’t realised was exactly how much and that for them to be able to access that part of themselves, I would have to spoon feed them with many different imaginative ideas, instead of expecting the playful ideas to come from them.  I suppose, this is what makes them so different from most of the kids I’ve ever known.

What’s Next:

1. Sharing Personal photographs:  Homework reviewing photographs taken by children unsupervised at home etc.

2. Story Building with Props:   Using props to photograph alongside Alien dolls to create a cohesive narrative.

3. Outdoor Expedition: Children take photographs of their aliens to document how the Alien feels in an environment outside of the school.

Other Useful Links:

PhotoGiraffe Worksheet Exercise 5. PDFhttps://photogiraffelive.files.wordpress.com/2013/04/4-intro-to-alien.pdf

Story Telling with Persona Dolls:  http://www.teachingforchange.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/ec_personadolls_english.pdf

Emotional Literacy 101:  http://www.examiner.com/article/emotional-literacy-101-how-can-we-use-dolls-to-help-children-talk-about-their-emotions

Let’s Ask the Dolls Tutorial:  https://plus.google.com/photos/117052915866560521594/albums/5372812705499284737/5372813578364009986?banner=pwa

Teaching Kids Photography: http://www.artfulparent.com/2012/01/guest-post-frame-it-teaching-kids-the-art-behind-photography.html

Teaching your child about Emotions:  http://connectability.ca/2010/09/23/teaching-your-child-about-emotions/

Children Expressing Emotions Through Photography: http://books.google.co.uk/books?hl=en&lr&id=pTXJFG9J7pQC&oi=fnd&pg=PP1&dq=expressing++emotion+through+photography+children&ots=ZdjZrv9QSn&sig=oDp059l_6pog7RBZdUV6mQ7MWps#v=onepage&q&f=false

Aliens Have Feelings Too! (Part 2)

3 Apr

Aliens have feelings too – (Part 2): 

A Photography Project aimed to develop the Emotional Literacy of vulnerable school children.

Working with:

Group A – Year 2 (6-7 year olds)

Morning session 2.5 hrs

Group B – Year 3 (7-8 year olds)

Afternoon session 2.5 hrs

Objectives:

  1. Vocabulary Building:  Using pictures to help children talk about the variety of emotions and also to help them develop (an already) devised play that they will later act out.
  2. Creative Writing:  Group work.  Creating a written story using pictures and the vocabulary they learnt earlier.
  3. Drama:  Enacting a short role play based on six primary emotions, based upon a short play about some children who become stranded in the forest.  They stumble across a spaceship and are frightened by aliens.  Finally they call for help and are rescued by police.

Week One:  Story Building and Role Play

Presented herewith will be material from the scheme of works developed and used by myself to help cultivate the emotional literacy of 10 “vulnerable” children at Priory Lower School, Bedford.   The scheme had been planned weeks before I began the workshops, however I only received feedback on this scheme a day prior to my start date, when I went into Priory Lower School for the second time to meet the senior teacher, to discuss the schedule of work and it’s suitability for the students I was going to be working with.

As my previous article relates, (Introduction:  Aliens Have Feelings Too! (Part One), 18th March’13) most of the children selected in this project possess a level of English lower than the average standard for their age group.  Mrs Wakefield, the senior teacher told me that when she asks her students how they are feeling, they often tell her, “happy” or “sad”, without fully being able to express or elaborate.  Furthermore, she informed me that imagination was not a particularly strong trait possessed amongst the selected pupils.   Having been giving this information a day before I commenced working with the two groups, I realised that I may have to do some improvisation as I went along.  However, I will present the material as it was initially created, with PDF’s (at the end of this article) of all of the worksheets from week one for fellow practitioners or school teachers wishing to utilise material as they deem fit. Please note, that as an ex-English teacher, I have used some of this material already with foreign students whilst working at British Council so it is also adaptable for EFL classes with young learners.

Below follow pictures used for this project alongside anticipated questions and answers for both sessions.  Naturally the older students from year 3 (aged 7-8) have a stronger vocabulary than the students from the year below, who need more prompts. However, I will keep the details as brief as possible in order to keep the article’s pace swift and engaging for readers who may be interested in using the same or similar material, providing only the lesson plan material henceforth.   Finally, I will end the article with a short conclusion, detailing problems I did not anticipate.

1.    Vocabulary Building Using Pictures

Introduction informing pupils they have been selected by their teacher to take part in a photography project, at the end of which they will have a complete book displaying their photographs.  “The title of our photography project is ‘Aliens Have Feelings Too’, because for the next 4 weeks we will be exploring different feelings we and others can feel.”

But, were they going to take any photographs today?  No, because today was a story building day and we were going to make a story based on different feelings and then we would act them out.

 

a.)  Activating Schemata

Fig I). Aliens

Fig I). Aliens

               Q. Look at the picture what do you see?

A. Aliens

Q. Has anyone here ever met an alien?

A. varied one child claimed she had.

Q.  How would you feel if you saw an alien?

A. Scared, frightened

Q. How do you think the alien would feel if they met you?

A.  Varied answers from scared to assertions that they would want to eat them up.

Fig.II). Planets

Fig.II). Planets

Q. What is this picture of?

A. Space

Q. Which planet do we live in?

A. Earth

Q. Can you name any more planets in outer space?

A.  Mars (was predominately the planet most of them were familiar with.  There was some confusion between the sun and planets but I prompted the names quickly and asked them which planet was nearest  to earth followed by suggesting that if aliens did come to earth they would come from mars (for imaginations sake)).

b.)  Feelings.

This activity consists of a collection of 6 different pictures of ‘smiley emotions’ which were each presented to the students on 6 separate worksheets. The numbers 1-5 listed beneath so that they could think of 5 different synonyms to describe the emotions conveyed.  The object being that in order to develop their emotional literacy, they must first be equipped with sufficient vocabulary to express their basic emotions.  The ‘smileys’ used are based upon the 6 primary emotions that caption each of the scenes in the devised play which the children act out later.  They appear in this exact order because they are connected to the chronology of the story.  These primary emotions are:

  1. 1.    Happy,  2.  Evil,  3.  Lost   4.  Surprised, 5.  Afraid and  6. Brave.

 

“Can you think of 5 more words to describe the emotions each of these 6 faces are feeling?”

  • 2. evil

  

  

c.)  The Storyboard:

As seen here, ‘The Storyboard’ is a set of 6 images connected to the creative writing which I anticipated would help them to conjure the scenes from the final act in step3.

Storyboard

Storyboard

 

The 6 key words that need to be elicited for the development of the story from each of the different pictures are:

1.    Picnic   2.  Forest    3.  Children    4.  Spaceship   5.  Aliens   6. Police

 

 

 

 

 2.    Creative Writing

Use these words
Happy

Evil

Lost

Surprised

Afraid

Brave

Creative Writing: Students working together

Creative Writing: Students working together

Due to the small number of students in each group (4-5) I grouped them in pairs or a group of three.  Team names were appointed and points were given as an incentive to work together and write up the best story using the pictures, the words from the pictures above and the primary words used from the ‘smiley emotions’.  The purpose of this activity is so that the students are already familiar with the story before they practice acting it out.  The pictures are used to elicit the pre-devised story and help them to visualize and imagine.  It is also an activity aimed to aid their writing skills and it can also be used to develop their team working skills as well as assisting them to practice the vocabulary of emotions that they have used in the previous ‘smiley emotions’ (1b. Feelings) activity. The stories are read out at the end from each group to share with all and points are added up in the end of the activity to announce the winning group.

 

 3.    Drama

Due to the number of students in the class the drama the script from the play that I gained inspiration from was not used in it’s entirety as I guessed that the students would struggle with the number of character in the play.  Instead we had 2 children, 2 aliens and in one group I played the authoritative role of the brave police officer.  I guided the children holding up the picture of each emotion picture to indicate the scene.  This on my part was an improvisation which was a little hit and miss on where I wanted the play to go.

Conclusion:  What worked? What could have been done better?

 

1.    Vocabulary Building:

  • When using pictures to help children talk about the variety of words describing emotions, I should have done a list of 5 words for each smiley face.  I had not considered carefully, the possibility of a limited vocabulary possessed by the students and had to revert to a thesaurus online.
  • Often when shown the pictures if the smiley emotions the kids went off on tangents screaming, ‘happy’, ‘sad’, and ‘angry’ which they were right to suggest as I had  taken for granted that some synonyms could be interchangeable from one picture to another when I had prepared the material.
  •  I soon learnt that to elicit the words I desired I had to give them scenarios.  Luckily, I was quick enough on my feet to do this, but in hindsight, I would prepare all this beforehand.
  • Spelling was a problem for the children so, extra time should be considered to help them with them writing the words correctly, because in order for them to see the whiteboard properly, I needed the lights off, which meant they couldn’t see what they were writing.  It would be helpful to consider this for any future endeavours.  Have two boards and white board pen if you are using an electronic whiteboard.

2.    Creative Writing:

  • Unfortunately,   the written stories produced were not all the same as I had anticipated.  Though we went through the pictures on the board together, and made the story together before they began the writing exercise, the children didn’t make the connection and still all wrote completely different stories.
  • They found it hard to work together and some students were faster and more dominant than others, which led to a lot of work being dictated and copied.  Having done this activity with EFL students before, I had not predicted this problem as the class I’d worked with before all produced near enough the same story.  To tackle this problem what I can do next time, is select 6 different pictures for the storyboard with a precise correlation with the ‘smiley emotions’.  Giving each student (or group) a number from 1 – 6.  They each get a picture from the 6 pictures from the storyboard and the correlating ‘smiley emotions’ to describe the emotion of that part of the story.   They then write an extract from that part of the story with the words they need. (e.g. 1. Picnic 1. Happy face:  One day there were some children who were very happy because they went on a picnic).

3.    Drama:

  • I had not known how many students I was going to have in each session until an evening before I commenced work.  By that time I did not have enough time to change the script.  Having realised a bit too late that the play had too many characters in it, the play had to be performed without the script.  As I began working with the children, I soon realised at their age they would struggle greatly if I had used that particular script.  The acting part started off very slowly and although a lot of fun for the children, quite frustrating for me as they would get awfully excited about chasing and being chased and would rush all the other scenes to get to that point, after which they would become deranged little monsters hard to calm down.
  • Had there been an organised script for them to follow this might not have been the case as they would have had to concentrate on their lines.  The mistake I made was that I kept holding up the pictures of emotions not understanding that they had not made that connection in the first instance because, they had written completely different stories anyway.  Although it must be noted, that I had briefly read and acted the story out for them showing them the pictures, but it took longer than I thought for them to get it precisely right.  My advice would be to edit the script well,  preferably with the students names worked in if you can (particularly with students as young as 6-8) or spend make better visual ques for them if you wish for them your students to have the freedom to improvise.

Success:

Despite all the criticism of my own methods, I will say that the children thoroughly enjoyed themselves throughout the sessions.  Most of them dipped when sharing their stories, but I feel that was my own fault for not having devised the activity better.  Expressing themselves and learning about emotions is not something they have been given a chance to do before and being small groups meant that they got a buzz from the special attention I could give to them.  The drama session really bought them out of their shells and there were some very good actors in the class even the ones who were a little shy at the start got into character.  They still remember the activity and we use it as a warm up at the start of each session or a reward for good behaviour at the end.

 

What’s next?   Week Two:

1. Introduction to the alien Doll family

2. Creating unique alien characters

3. Photographing objects with consideration to framing compositions.

 

Links:

Mini-Drama Sketches: http://efltheatreclub.co.uk/index.php?p=1_9

PDF’s from week one: 1. Feeling Faces  2. Picture the Story  3. Story of Emotion

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