Archive | Media RSS feed for this section

What is a Poet? – #14SecondPoem Movement

15 Mar

Poetry in Motion

competition poster

What is a Poet?

#14SecondPoem Competition

Think, Shoot, Contribute!

Answer the question above to take part and open up a global discussion about the role of a Poet in Society. 

On Twitter

1) Shoot a 14-second poetry film in Black and White (shot with a plain white or black background)

2) Upload it to Youtube.

3) Tweet us to enter the competition, including @NajmaHush and the hashtags #14SecondPoem #WhatisaPoet?

E.g.: Hey @NajmaHush, here’s my contribution to the #14SecondPoem for #WhatisaPoet?  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=obj_SyM7yS4 

On Instagram

1) Shoot a 14-second poetry film.

2) Upload it and tag us: @photogiraffelive, hashtag #WhatisaPoet? and  #14SecondPoem

E.g.: Hey @PhotoGiraffe,  here’s my contribution to the #14SecondPoem for #WhatisaPoet?

 

Rules

Submissions close at midnight on Wed 1st June 2016. All entries must be in by this time.

One entry per person.

We’ll announce the winner on Monday 6th June 2016.

What you’ll win

  • All entries will be contributing towards the ‘What is a Poet? Project, opening up a global debate, to provide a wider community of artists to get seen and heard.

 

  • 21 winners will be selected to be included in the short film, What is Poet?, to be exhibited at Poetry Festivals in the UK and abroad (locations and release dates to be announced soon).
What is a Poet? movie poster

What is a Poet? movie poster

Advertisements

What is a Poet? – A Film Dedicated to Poets

14 Mar

PhotoGiraffe Production are very pleased to announce the forth coming release of our debut short film.  Written in poetic verse, ‘What is a Poet?’  has been created to celebrate poetry as an inclusive form of art that is currently thriving with people rich in diversity, dedicated to sharing their experience with anyone human enough to contemplate, the bitter sweet complexities of life.

 

What is a Poet? - Film poster

What is a Poet? – Film poster

 

 ‘What is a Poet?’ seeks to highlight how poetry can be found in a variety of people, places, methods and practices; from musicians to painters and supermarkets to mountain tops.  This film has been created as a beacon of inspiration to remind all those who appreciate and create poetry, that what they do is a significant and powerful contribution towards the understanding of human nature and thus can affect the evolution of humankind.

Written, produced and directed by Najma Hush as a collaborative performance piece.  Starring Femi Abidogun, Glyn Phillips, Kate Walton, Leah Atherton and Marcia Calame, who have all contributed individually to the film by writing their own introduction, representing the large minority of a great number of Spoken Word Artists from the West Midlands, UK and sending out a message of love to all the poets around the world, this film is simply poetry in motion.

Read our questions and answers from Najma Hush about the film and learn more about the exciting news on how you can also contribute towards this on-going project to promote Poets and Poetry.

Behind the Scene: Najma Hush, Byrone Nicholson & Leah Atherton

Q & A with Najma Hush 

 

What was your inspiration for the film?

On National Poetry Day (Nov’2014), I couldn’t see the point of going out to celebrate, because at the time it seemed to me that the only people who went to poetry performance events were poets who wanted to perform their own poems and whom also made up the majority of the audience.  In this respect, I felt quite disillusioned by my role in society as a poet and wanted to explore why human beings wrote poetry and its function in arts and humanity.  Despite my more sombre mood at the time, the first draft of the poem was far more inspirational than I had anticipated and the idea to use the work as a collaborative piece was born.

 

How did the film get off the ground? What was the process of getting the film made?

After completing the final version of the poem, the driving force dependent on turning this script into a short film, was gaining the support of other poets whom I was already acquainted with and had either collaborated or worked alongside before, because although the film has been created to promote poets and poetry, effectively the script is a poem which has been written by a poet who is approaching other poets to memorise and recite her words, when they have their own which they would naturally prioritise.   Also, the film has been created on shoe string budget and therefore the performers were called to star in the film for the love of poetry alone, with an earnest promise to feast heartily upon my mother’s delicious home cooking whilst on the job.

 

 

Behind the Scene: Najma Hush, Byrone Nicholson & Marcia Calame

 

 How long was the shoot and where was it?

I was lucky enough to be affiliated with a young publishing house with their own art studio and art gallery (Mapseeker Publishing Ltd), where I was formally a poet in residence.  They kindly allowed me to use their space and I also hired locally upon occasion.  As the shooting of the film took 4 days to complete, it was spread out over the course of 4 months.  Initially having accumulated the support of 16 poets, near the end this number whittled down to 5 professional actors who were passionate about the cause and dedicated to the same vision despite their own busy schedules and various work commitments.

 

What have you learnt since completing your first short film and how will it help you to improve and make more? 

I learnt a lot about the preparation that goes into pre-production in order to co-ordinate and organise the shooting of a film.  And also about how a director must have precise vision for every single scene from start to finish, paying great attention to detail.  As well as how a good producer should execute every task in fine detail at the event of each shoot.   I am pleased to have learnt how to plan each shot using storyboards, just by making this very simple film.  I have also learnt the value of clearly communicating aims, objectives and roles with all parties involved, as well as the great importance of covering all legal issues with well documented agreements.

I loved directing the performances and coming from a background in dance and fashion photography, I found shooting film , very similar to photography only with equal attention to sound and movement, as well as the visuals.  I believe that this will help me create more cinematic poetry films which will improve the cinematography of any forthcoming poetography videos.  Up-till-date, my work has been more reliant on my photography and videography skills with an emphasis in the quality of the spoken word and therefore may be lacking cinematic attention.

The second biggest challenge and the largest asset I have gained whilst making this film, is sound and visual editing skills, prior to which I had little knowledge and learnt at a reasonable rate through practice, post production.  This has given me more confidence to consider making more dynamic and ambitious poetography films in the near future, which I am already passionate about creating.

 

Behind the Scene - Byrone Nicholson & Najma Hush

Behind the Scene – Byrone Nicholson & Najma Hush

 

Tell us about the soundtrack for this short film and the reasons behind your choice?

As there are two sections to this film, there are only two sound tracks, both of which are licensed under Creative Commons, Attribution (3.0).  For the first half, the music is an uplifting, contemporary piece called, SunBirds by CoCrew (http://ccmixter.org/  (2012)).  With its relaxing hip-hop beat, Sunbirds gives the introduction a modern, urban feel, separating it from the second half which features  Fredrick Chopin’s, Nocturnes no. 1 Op. 9 by Florence Robineau, (https://commons.wikimedia.org/ 2013)),  a  timeless classic,  picked in direct contrast to the introductory piece as I felt that the tone and texture of this composition complimented the emotional dynamics of the poem well.

Ever since I began to appreciate Chopin’s music I noted the varying intonations in his compositions imitating the phonetic aspects of human speech and after further research I was delighted to learn that Chopin was in fact, a sound poet who magnificently composed ‘verse without words’ in his arrangements.   Thereafter, my mind had been made up to use his work alone and set myself the challenge of listening to various playbacks of the film’s audio accompanied by his symphonies; in terms of its mood, I felt that Nocturnes no. 1 Op. 9 matched the verbal intonation of the poem best.  With its focus upon sound as much as visuals, simplicity has been the main prerogative of this film to draw emphasis on the richness of its discourse.

 

Where should we expect to see your short film?

‘ What is a Poet?’ will be screened at Literature and Poetry festivals all over the UK and similar festivals abroad with release dates to be announced soon.  I have also created an online #WhatisaPoet?  campaign, inviting poets from all around the world to contribute globally towards this film by submitting their own black and white short film a #14SecondPoem in response to the question ‘What is a Poet?’ This will expand the spirit of the whole project by giving poets a chance to think and respond to this question, opening up a global debate to provide a wider community of artists to get seen and heard.  In this way I anticipate the project will expand and the film will also progress as the best 21 clips from the campaign will be compiled to make an extra 5min feature to be screened as part of the short film (#WhatisaPoet?  #14secondpoem @Twitter, Instagram).

Think Shoot Contribute

#WhatisaPoet? #14Second Poem

 

As you may have already noted, this is a very interdependent project, with a communal objective, which has been and still is dependant upon other Poets taking part and would not have been possible without the people who have contributed towards the making of this film.  Here’s a bit more about the incredible Spoken Word Artists as well as members of the crew, who have already dedicated their time and effort – all for the love of Poetry with the same view to promote the Poet’s job as an important role within our society.

 

 About the Cast

 

Femi Abidogun Femi Abidogun (Poet, Performer):  A West Midlands-based poet and writer, who has two published collections of poetry –That Long Walk (2015) and Blonde Grass (2012) both originally published by Thynks Publications Ltd, Nottingham.  His writings have also been showcased in a number of anthologies and publications.

He has performed to a variety of audiences including literary events and festivals, as well as on radio.  He is a member of literary groups such as Writers Without Borders and The Poetry Society.

Apart from writing, he enjoys reading, travelling, music and sports.  Femi believes poetry is all about expression and as such, the opportunity presented by the production of “What is A Poet” was just one further great way to do just that.  He says he thoroughly enjoyed every minute of its filming which he describes as a “unique experience worthy of being proud of”.

 

Glyn PhillipsGlyn Phillips (Poet, Performer):  A Poet / Musician / Radio Presenter / DJ.  Surprisingly, Glyn Phillips only came out of his literary shell about two years ago after decades as a percussionist and DJ – and latterly a world music radio presenter. Tired of being ‘in the dark at the back of the band’, Glyn decided to finally get centre stage with his own joyful yet anarchic wordplay and exuberant yet meticulous wordsmithery. Glyn’s theatrical delivery and desire to engage an audience means that each performance is just that: a true performance!

Glyn works in a bewildering array of subjects and styles from heart-rending social observations and political rants to comic vignettes and whimsical tales. An acute social conscience, a love of words, an ear for sounds and an eye for the ridiculous has led him to produce poetry, songs and spoken word pieces that have taken audiences on a journey from emotionally painful recognition to raucous laughter in just one session.

Whatever you do, watch out for his ‘chap-hopping’ alter ego, Mr Armitage Spode, who is likely to jump up (at entirely inappropriate moments) and indulge himself in more ribald innuendo than you could squeeze into a burlesque dancer’s corset…

Glyn has written a 190 page book of poems, Still Life (2015), and a short story, The Tale of the Magic Soup Stone (2015), published by Food for Thought (2016).

 

Kate WaltonKate Walton (Poet, Performer)Performance poet, lyrical true life storyteller, workshop facilitator and StoryTramp, ‘One woman’s poetical mission’ to unravel the mysteries and create legends through the art of sharing stories and reconnecting with the people and poetics of life.

Slam winning poet and shortlisted by BASE as Outstanding Newcomer to Storytelling in 2013, Kate has enjoyed success with ‘I Am Blackbird’, her transformational one woman show and is currently working on her second solo show ready for 2017.

Taking inspiration from her own adventures and the people she meets along the way, Kate mixes light with shade to combine her well-crafted lines and natural performance style to engage with audiences and offer a gentle reflection through her journey of life.

Kate is currently involved in a number of projects throughout the UK, from performing with the itinerant troupe, Flashlight True-life Storytellers in Birmingham, a regular teller at Natural Born Storytellers in London, one of many Tribal Voices that keep the green field festival fires burning brightly and Co-founder and host of Wild Words and Wisdom, an intimate evening of poetry, story and song for women in Hertfordshire.

Kate is passionate about the sharing of wisdom and as such her ongoing project StoryTramp often takes her out on the road in search of stories, people and the ultimate of human experience.

 

Leah AthertonLeah Atherton (Poet, Performer):   A linguist, poet and spoken word artist, hailing from the windswept Devon coast, Leah blew ashore in red brick country in 2006 and has been actively involved with the local spoken word circuit for the last 2 years.

Having spent her formative years scribbling stories and poems in the back of school exercise books and old envelopes, Leah’s love of poetry caught up to her as a postgraduate student at Oxford, where she began honing her craft in earnest.

She has since headlined at poetry and music nights including Sunplugged, Howl and Stirchley Speaks. A vocal advocate on social justice issues, her work has been featured at a number of events combining art and activism, including the Amo: LoveISexhibition at Birmingham Art Gallery; Amnesty International’s satellite event 16 Days of Activism: Women Unplugged; and the Critical Conditions: Calais photo exhibition launch at Impact Hub Birmingham.

Bringing her unique brand of quiet observation and raw honesty to her poetry, she weaves together the wildness of the landscapes she calls home with the joy and heartache of the everyday. She is a firm believer that magic is never lost, only forgotten.

 

Marcia CalameMarcia Calame (Poet, Performer):  Poet and Spoken Word Artist who has performed in places such as: Glastonbury Poetry and Words, International Women’s Day, Black History Month, Youth Theatre and Education and is also a mentor for aspiring youths.

 

Marcia is a diverse and dynamic Poet, both on stage and on page, for all ages; with poems included in many anthologies. Such poems like, ‘A sense of touch’ representing the Midlands-Poetry for the people by the people; and ‘Rippled Splendour,’ which received the Editors choice Award. Marcia is part of the ten writers collaboration of the Midlands, which is included in the Anthology, Celebrate Wha (Smokestack 2011), where you will find her poems such like: Speak English and Going Dutch.   Living in Birmingham, UK, Marcia is currently working on the completion of her new book.

 

Najma HushNajma Hush (Writer, Director, Producer): Master of Media and Creative Arts; a published poet and photographer who also combines the two mediums to create an emerging genre of art, which she terms ‘Poetography’, a concept which she has developed over the course of time since 2013.  With her first exhibition as a Poetographer at Walsall Arts Festival (Dec, 2014), Hush has considerably evolved her practice from creating silent photographic animations in combination with poetic texts to short poetic films, heavily featuring performing artists using videographic images, alongside spoken word all synchronised harmoniously to music.

Former Artist in residence at Arts4ArtSake (Custard Factory, 2013) and former Poet in Residence at Mapseeker Publishing Studio & Art Gallery (Aldridge, 2014), she has had her fine Art Photographic works exhibiting in various locations around the West Midlands, whilst also organising her own monthly Exhibition for Exhibitionists events (2013/2014) providing a platform for other Poets and Musicians to perform at the opening for her art exhibitions.  Presently whilst expanding upon her Poetography experiments to contribute to an emerging genre of moving digital literature, (watch Youtube @ Najma Hush) she is working on her debut Poetography book as well the release of her first short film ‘What is a Poet’ starring five other Spoken Word Artists.

About the Crew

Byrone Nicholson

Byrone Nicholson (Lighting, Sound and Camera Operator):  Video editor and camera operator with a BA Honours in Media Productions, his background stems from creating films within the format of documentary and the making of music videos. Producer of his own film, ‘Born to Fish’ (released, 2014), a short documentary summarizing how one man’s passion for a sport can influence, not only his own life, but the lives of those whom he teaches.

Previously the official camera and sound operator for Walsall Arts Festival (2014) Nicholson’s already enjoys the diversity in art and has worked with many live spoken word and street artists.  The, ‘What is a Poet’ project further enhanced his opportunity to apply the skills he’s learnt, but also show his greater fondness of poetry.

Nicholson is currently working with the Sikh channel and wishes to continue learning and working with diverse cultures, whilst also creating or collaborating on unique projects that bring forth positivity and knowledge.

 

Studio Management Team

Soombul Rafique (Floor Manager):  Usually an executive legal clerk by day, Soombul worked as a volunteer on set responsible for passing on cues to the director communicating with all cast and crew to ensure timings were met and filming went smoothly so that shooting went according to the set plan

 Rhi Rhi Khanum (Sound Supervisor):  Usually working behind the camera as a model on several projects with photographers, stylists and makeup artist, Rhi Rhi worked for the first time on a film set as a volunteer to provide assistance, working closely alongside Nicholson and following his instructions regarding sound.

Reshma Khunum (Script Supervisor): An undergraduate student of Media, Reshma worked on set as a volunteer Script Supervisor making sure that all lines were covered during the filming process.

 

So there you have it,  we will be posting more information regarding this continuing project and the exact details about how you can take part and contribute with your 14 second poem as well as news and more information about where the film will be released and exhibited, so follow this blog to stay tuned, share this article and check out the hashtags online.

social media

Hashtags:  #WhatisaPoet?  #14SecondPoem

Najma Hush’ Exhibition at the Artwork Cafe

18 Aug

Here is the short promotional video filmed by Nu:Bi Magazine at the Artwork Cafe for their Arts and Culture section on the Nu:Bi Hub, youtube channel, covering a short feature on my latest exhibition.  Check it out!

 

Najma Hush’s exhibition is on at Artwork Cafe, (4 Temple Square, Edbaston, Birmingham. UK) from 4 th August – 24th September.  Currently showing five pieces from Female Force and three from Abstract Elements for a limited period only; this exhibition is due to change after only three weeks, when the exhibiting artist, Najma Hush will change the showcase displaying further works from various other collections.

Exhibition at Art Work Cafe

10 Aug

Many thanks to Nu:Bi Magazine, who came down to the ArtWork Cafe in Edgbaston last week to take a look and find out more about my latest exhibition there and who also filmed a short promotional video about the exhibition for their youtube channel, The Nu:Bi Hub to be released very soon …so excited and can’t wait to share it.  In the meantime check out these photographs :

Images courtesy of NU:BI Magazine who filmed a short promotional feature on my latest exhibition @ Artwork Cafe. Photography by Shahid Chohan.

Najma Hush’s exhibition is on at Artwork Cafe, (4 Temple Square, Edbaston, Birmingham. UK) from 4 th August – 24th September.  Currently showing five pieces from Female Force and three from Abstract Elements for a limited period only; this exhibition is due to change after only three weeks, when the exhibiting artist, Najma Hush will change the showcase displaying further works from various other collections.  Stay tuned for the promotional video by Nu:Bi Magazine to be released on The Nu:Bi Hub youtube channel, within just a few days…

 

Realities of Living, With Fiction Online

4 Jun

First released in 2007, A Life of Recluse is still the only interactive hypertext fiction that combines literature with digital imagery, sound and music. Available now online, free for all reading enthusiasts.

 stickypostnet

Back in 2007 Najma Hush, the author of A Life of Recluse, published a story as HTML.   Back then it was the first interactive hypertext fiction to combine literature with still and video imagery, including sound and music.  Now, once again, six years later being released on wordpress, it still is. 

 

A Life of Recluse is an audio, visual literary book, which has been especially created for the web and made available for all new media junkies, interested in experimental writing.   Progressing as nonlinear, its narrative is composed through the medium of 78 nodes.  This short and technologically speaking, quite simple hypertext fiction tells a complex and enigmatic tale about race, culture and the struggle to affirm ones personal identity.  

 

Set in 1997, Lowestoft; Britain’s forgotten seaside town, this is a dark and disturbing story about five friends, each from different national and cultural backgrounds, who are ‘allowed to be free, yet not free to be allowed‘.  To challenge the notions of individuality and personal identity, the author seeks to explore various cultural and personal constraints through the lives of each of the characters and reveal what they are prepared to risk and lose in order that they may gain their personal freedom.

 

Be prepared to feel slightly uncomfortable, disorientated and sometimes disturbed.  But remember turn on the computer’s speakers or plug in headphones to hear the sound, as you navigate the text by clicking hyperlinks and image-maps.

 “This hypertext fiction had always been created to be self published online.  I wanted to share a new media, creative arts experiment, composing a unique literary form.  But since having taken the HTML offline, I had always intended to re-publish the fiction at an online source where these artistic contributions, would never be lost.  I hope it may be read and appreciated by many for years to come.  The beauty of using self publishing tools like WordPress, means I can share my work for free, just because I believe I have something universal to communicate in a unique way and I would like people to read it.”  – Najma Hussain on online self publishing tools.

Read Hypertext Fiction A Life of Recluse .

Aliens Have Feelings Too (Part Five)

5 May

A Photography Project aimed to develop the Emotional Literacy of vulnerable school children.

Work Hard - Play Hard

Work Hard – Play Hard

Working with:

Group A – Year 2 (6-7 year olds)

Morning session 2.5 hrs

Group B – Year 3 (7-8 year olds)

Afternoon session 2.5 hrs

1. Project Review:   To organize the material of all the previous sessions into an inter-connected whole.  To fix ideas learned in the mind through repetition.   To recall old ideas with new connections.

2. Story Boarding:   For the groups to review all their edited photographs and derive meaning from each picture, paying particular attention to feelings.

3. Brain Storming a Cohesive Narrative:  To create one cohesive narrative per group using the best photographs they took over the course of three sessions.  

Week four:  Using Photography to Storyboard 

As discussed in the previous article (Aliens Have Feelings Too! (Part Three)), when working with the two groups to develop a narrative, I soon found that they needed to be helped greatly if they were to achieve this and therefore I decided that we would create one story per group working with the photographs that they had already taken, dedicating these efforts to team work rather than having ten short stories in one book.

Here follows a brief description of the processes taken to complete the final book which has now been produced for Priory Lower School Bedford.  It consists of two stories one from each group and I have also made a audio visual story to accompany hardback book, so that each child can have a copy of their work within budget.

Working Hard - Playing Hard

Working Hard – Playing Hard

 1. Project Review: 

a.) Vocabulary:   From week one session reviewing six primary emotions and 5 different synonyms for each.  This is not a drilling lesson for repetition, but rather to see how the children have evolved.   When they recall vocabulary, I ask them if they can put that word in a little story (scenario).  In this way you can assess how they the students have progressed with what they have learned as apposed to just simply remembering what was taught.

b.)  Role-Play:    This time I filmed it for them so that they could watch themselves back and see how they had improved. The children from year 3 showed an increase of improvement than year 2, who showed little signs of having improved their role play skills.  I assessed this through their coordination and how they reacted to the lines and ques of their ‘co-stars’.  The children in year three showed such a dramatic improvement in their performance, keeping in time, ques for coming in, off ‘stage’, I was actually shocked.  What was even more surprising was the children reaction to watching themselves on video.  Year 3’s were very amused, but yet very critical of their own performance.  A few of them even commented that they “sucked” which in truth compared to other children of their age they probably did, but I was just amazed and very proud at how far they had come.  Because the purpose of a drama activity is not just to rouse children imaginations, but  also to gain focus on a task and learn to work together as a team.  Drama needs constant discipline and attention  if the overall production is to be of a higher standard.  If I did something different I would have filmed them practicing on every session so that they could see how they had improved and why – which could be attributed to their concentration.  I realize now what an important skill this is for vulnerable children to learn. These things need to be spelled out for children so that they can see the benefits in each and every activity.  Play is fun but it should teach you something too.

2.  Story Boarding:

This activity was not conducted in the conventional way story boarding is known to be carried out, (i,e with the story coming before the pictures).  We had the pictures first, but we did the story until the end.   Needless to say, this activity fulfilled the criterion for most story board session, giving the children visuals to think and plan, as a group of people brainstorming their ideas together.  Placing their ideas on a board and then arranging the storyboard on the wall. This fosters more ideas and generates consensus inside the group.

Conventional Story Board Layout.

Conventional Story Board Layout.

a.) Objectives:

*   There are 20 pictures on the board.  We need to make a story using the photographs we took to create a book for Priory Lower School.  We don’t have to use all the pictures, we only need enough to make one story.  All the pictures have numbers from 1-20, but this does not mean the story has to be in this order, we can jumble up all the numbers and I will give them new numbers so I know what happens at the beginning, the middle the end for when I make our book.

* Concept check:  How many pictures do we have?  How many stories are we going to make?

b.) Rules:

*   We are as working as a team and there is no ‘I’ in ‘We’.  So what ‘we’ need to remember is, that these are our photographs and this will be our story, which we will give as a gift to our school. (To encourage team spirit.)

 *    Nobody can touch the board except the person who writes on it (in this case me – because they will all want to touch the board).

c.) Generating ideas:

This activity requires a great deal of thought from the children.   If the children are silent for 5 minutes, then you know you’re on to a winner!  The aim is to encourage that thought process.  When doing this the children actually told me that they ‘We’re quiet because they we’re thinking’, I was well chuffed because they had problems generally focusing on most activities – so I knew that this meant that they had made progress.

* Look at the photographs and think of some words we can use to describe what’s happening in each picture.  Don’t worry if you can’t think of something to say straight away, you can take your time, think carefully and then when you want to speak put your hand up.

* Write down the words the children give to describe each pictures underneath each picture.  I deliberately edited the photographs making some brighter, darker etc to create a  stronger mood for each picture to help them imagine.

3. Brainstorming

The Next step was brainstorming the ideas which the children were already familiar with from week 3.  With all the pictures laid out  the Mind Map Tree for Brain Storming is in a place where everyone can see, I asked the children to think about:

* Your favorite story?  (Students example, Goldie Locks and the Three Bears.)

*How many people are there in the story?

* Are they all people or are some animals ?

* What we call the different creatures in one story? (characters)

*  How many characters does this story have?  (Use the pictures to count.  We used other toy props and in some photographs there were more than one alien in some pictures).

* I list the number of characters they see, then ask the children to give them all names.  I write all the ideas down.  No one idea is better than another.  I write everything down to encourage them all to give me more ideas.

* Then we vote on the best ideas.  If you have a tie you can throw your tuppence in there, or better yet,  flip a coin.

* Start with, what happens first.  As the story unravels take down each picture from the board and place it on the storyboard, giving each picture a caption.

Practitioners Process:

Thereafter I took the pictures from the storyboard with the captions and the mind map and wrote a story with their  ideas.  I produced a hard back book for the school and an audio visual story for the children to take home and play on their computer or dvd players as the children expressed there disappointment at not receiving a book to take home.  Unfortunately the budget would not stretch that far, so I decided to make a video for them to take home.

Here is the audio visual book of the story we created:

Conclusion:

During the final stages of production, Year 2 found it harder to create cohesion with there ideas for their final story.  On the other hand, Year 3’s story was remarkable imaginative and detailed.  They did not struggle with the concept of chronology and therefore writing up their ideas into a narrative was far less challenging than writing up the narrative for year 2; whilst the ideas year 2 produced were more fragmented and more challenging for me to make sense of when producing the final story,  I noticed that year 2 were more clear about how the Alien was feeling in each picture and were using more of the vocabulary previously taught and with more confidence, which to me indicated an improvement in their emotional literacy.

Both groups focus of attention had improved,  for when it came to creating the story, they were quieter and more thoughtful during the storyboard activity, assuring me that they were quieter because they were ‘thinking’.   This compared to when they had started was remarkable, as I had found it very challenging to get them to focus on most of the activities in the beginning of the project.  They had become more comfortable with the idea of using their imagination and could talk about how they were using it with much more fluency than when we had began.

From assessing their performance in the workshops by the end of the course, I can confidently say that their ability to talk about feelings had improved, as well as their ability to focus on activities using the imagination, which I link back to Emotional Literacy.  For if children are encouraged to talk about things that they cannot physically use their 5 senses for, then they will be more able  to express and share notions related to their internal world.

It was only when I completed the storybook that I realized that they had improved so much in terms of being able to access and express their internal world,  for the stories they created with me.  Their teachers also commented on an improvement in the children’s self-esteem and enthusiasm to participate in class.   Furthermore, I was delighted that they had told their teachers that they had enjoyed the sessions very much and wished that I could come back to work with them again.

Other Useful Links:

http://www.ehow.co.uk/how_7921634_do-storyboard-childrens-books.html

http://www.mightyartdemos.com/mightyartdemos-shulevitz.html

Women in Video Games? Never has there been a fiercer time than now!

16 Dec

Never has there been a fiercer time than now!

Contrary to historical belief, according to a recent article published on icould.com “… latest research suggests that the number of women working in the games industry has increased to 15% worldwide and even higher in some UK studios.”  As an example, they extend to the EA team behind the The Sims 3 game which they claim had more female than male developers, “so the tide is changing and there has never been a better time for women to break into the industry.” Oct, 2011.

Furthermore, as a positive career choice for women, icould.com state that “women who do work in the games industry are often more successful than their male colleagues.”  With figures taken from a recent survey by MCV, icould.com revealed that the average salary for women working in the games industry is “higher than an average male salary working in the same industry.

“I needed the experience to understand the world better. Although I love Poland, I don’t believe that the entire world can exist only in my own country. However, I have come back to Poland because I feel that this is where I belong and this is where I want to develop my career. I also love the way my country is changing and what it has become.” Beata Dudzic on working in Poland.

Nevertheless, PhotoGiarffe Live Arts wanted to find out how the Gaming industry weathers for real women – first hand – who are currently in it, in our present age.  So we sent our New Media correspondence, Najma Hush to speak to the marketing and PR representative, Beata Dudzic from Nintendo, Poland.   After having spent seven years living and studying in the multicultural, cosmopolitan city of London, Beata Dudzic, went back to live in Warsaw, Poland and pursued her presently flourishing career as a women in ‘Video Games’.

Read on to find out more, about exactly what young women should expect from the gaming industry, tips on how to break into a similar career successfully, and possible pitfalls to watch out for along the way.  Also read more to see how much further hot news and inside gossip PhotoGiraffe Live Arts was able to squeeze from the PR and Marketing woman, Beata Dudzic, at Nintendo, Poland.

So Beata, what do you do exactly?

After working in the arts and further studying arts management, I have become the marketing and PR representative in the video games industry. The industry I work for is very identifiable, as I work for Nintendo. Fans of the brand take it very seriously and emotionally. Imagine as if I was working for your favourite band…This means that I am very often dealing with the emotions of young people, whilst at the same time, still trying to balance these sensitive issues with very specific company politics.”

And how do you think you are benefiting others by what you are doing?

Making kids smile, because the whole gaming industry is so young and funky! And, particularly as a woman, I am playing an important part in an industry that is ordinarily a man’s world.  Also Nintendo has not been present in Poland for such a long time until now and I am part of building something new and fun. Of course it makes it easier that the brand is huge and well known.  My favourite part of the job is interacting with the fans. They all know me by my name and thanks to Facebook and Twitter I can be connected to them every day.”

So then when did Nintendo first get to Poland? 

“Nintendo is still not officially present in Poland. I represent their interests through the distributor. Beginning with my employment, Nintendo started investing money in marketing in Poland.”

Watch Beata Dudzic at Polygamia.pl (October, 2010)

Oh, I see!  So why do you think it’s taken Nintendo so long to reach out to that part of Europe?

“It’s hard to say really, but maybe by being very successful in America and Western Europe it was easier not to notice a big growing market like Poland but then again neither has it been needed until now.”


Does your job allow you to travel and work outside of Poland much?
Well yes, there is a fair amount of travel involved.  Nintendo of Europe is based in Frankfurt. Stadlbaue.  My direct employer and the distributor for Nintendo are based in Salzburg, Austria. That’s where I mostly travel to; usually for just a few meetings in a year. Apart from that, Expos in Koln, L.A, or for special conferences on the latest products in Europe; I was sent to Amsterdam last time (for example).”

What are you usually expected to do when you’re off location and on-site abroad?
“Oh you know, the usual; meetings, meetings and meetings…dinners, dinners…and dinners!”

Okay, so you said that the gaming industry is dominated by men, have you ever experienced any positive or negative discrimination because of your gender?

“Both!  It probably depends on the country, but I find it both rewarding and burdensome. As a woman I am constantly put in doubt about my competence and knowledge. At the same time as a woman I can lend myself in for more. But what generally matters at Nintendo is, my personality and communication skills – not my sex.”

But you are a very attractive woman; do you think that this has been to your advantage in becoming the public face of Nintendo Poland?

Well, thank you! Yes, I think it has, but it wasn’t the main advantage I hope.”

What advice would you give young women who want to get a career in the gaming industry?
“Really go for it! Perhaps start with playing some games first because they are really cool, but first you have to discover what is appropriate for you. There are many types of games to choose from, so look for out what is most interesting for you. Target your favourite gaming company, do all your research, share your knowledge and most importantly have passion.”

What’s your favourite Nintendo game?

Super Mario Galaxy II. I haven’t been playing it for a while as I’m
busy playing Zelda Skyward Sword at the moment, which is also amazing!!

What we want to see

Can you tell us any gossip about the next hottest thing coming out from Nintendo?
The new console is coming out in 2012, but this is not really gossip but only
official information as the rest is top secret and you will have to keep glued to our official worldwide Nintendo website for the hottest news.  Sorry!

Never mind, you cant say we didn’t try.  Although she is a tough cookie to crack, PhotoGiraffe Live Art would like to send a big warm thanks to Beata Dudzic for taking the time out to give us this exclusive  interview, as a Women in the Gaming Industry and we would also like to thank Nintendo, Poland  for lending her to us.

And so, if you are stuck on ideas  for Christmas presents, maybe Beata’s suggestions on her favourite games  could help you spread the Christmas cheer.  Check the following  link to the cheapest deal on a Nintendo 3DS that PhotoGiraffe Live Art found online or you could watch the lovely Beata in action at the PR launch of Nintendo 3DS in Poland, depending on how good your Polish is.

For further information about career opportunities for women in the Video Games industry check out:

http://icould.com/article/career-opportunities-for-women-in-the-video-gaming-industry/

https://www.facebook.com/icouldstories

We also recommend,

www.womeningames.com .

and

Lana Del Rey – Video Games

Poetry&Words at Glastonbury Festival

The only stage dedicated to poetry at Glastonbury Festival

Doublebunny Press

A Publishing Studio Apartment

PoetryFilm

PoetryFilm was founded by British artist Zata Banks FRSA in 2002

brijmohun

Just another WordPress.com site

iamshalina

http://iamshalin5.wix.com/iamshalina

multifarious moves

philosophical... creative...

Looping Static

Situation Hopeless, but not Serious

Reel Outtakes

Let me tell you my other stories that did not and will never reach your TV screens.

Photogiraffe Live Art

Just another WordPress.com site

Birmingham Social Media Cafe

Meeting on the last Friday of every month

Phosphorescence1001

- Poetry by Just Another Fish in the Sea - Najma Hush © 2017

Broken Content

Writings by Saqib Deshmukh

Jayne Stanton POETRY

Poetry and comment

Weaving Yarns

Heather Wastie writes poems, songs & monologues. This blog began with her oral history project with people who worked in the carpet industry in Kidderminster. Her carpet industry related pieces appear on this blog and in her book http://blackpear.net/authors-and-books/heather-wastie/

Quiet Compere Tour 2014

Touring ten poets x ten minutes format

Three Pigs

Academia, Cinephilia & Chlamydia

st8ment-urban art

st8mentWordPress.com weblog

Simple Pleasures

Visual Poetry, Photography and Quotes

Andrew Clayton

husband. father. musician. poet. preacher.

Kate Walton

Poetry, Stories & Other Stuff

Here come the lobsters!

Writing and all that.

A. Stuart Williams

What if? is the most amazing question of all...

Bucket List Publications

Indulge- Travel, Adventure, & New Experiences

The Nature of Business

Redesigning organisations for resilience

PRAMUDIYA

photography inspired by films

LEANNE COLE

Fine Art Photographer ~ Daring to be Different

Garyswordz

Just another WordPress.com site

Writers Without Borders

WWB Welcomes You

rednax20

Just another WordPress.com site

Me & Nostagi

Podróże i wspomnienia

JigneshChauhan.me

I Flash In Public !!!

From Tuesday

- connecting dots, one sentence at a time

"me no big chief ...

the world of littleindian

Macro M

Just another WordPress.com weblog

Bluesphinx's Blog

Just another WordPress.com weblog

Wordly Wise

Musings of an infinite soul

Amazing Events of my Life that will Enlighten,hmmm well maybe just Entertain....

Poetry, Observation, just Kim's prespective on Life...That's all...

doriane ∞ ray

www.dorianeraiman.com

WordPress.com

WordPress.com is the best place for your personal blog or business site.